RTS at 90

Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall celebrate 90 years of the RTS

Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall cut the RTS cake (Credit: RTS/Paul Hampartsoumian)

The visit celebrated the 90th anniversary of the Society, of which the prince has been patron since 1997, and took place at ITV Studios in London.

A reception was attended by some of the leading figures from the UK television industry including BBC Director of Content Charlotte Moore, Secretary of State Matt Hancock, Chief Executive of Channel 4 Alex Mahon and Chief Executive of ITV Dame Carolyn McCall.

RTS Yorkshire commemorates creation of the RTS

On 7 September 1927, John Logie Baird demonstrated his “noctovision” to a room full of enthusiasts at Leeds University. Baird referred to the technology as “seeing by electricity”.

At the close of the meeting, the formation of the society was proposed. Then known as the British Association, many of the founder members were from Leeds and Yorkshire.

Do you need £4000 for a history of television project?

The Shiers Trust grant, now in its 18th year, is normally worth £2,000. This year, to mark the 90th anniversary of the RTS, it has been raised to £4,000. 

Launched in 2000, the Shiers Trust grant is named after George Shiers, a distinguished US TV historian.

The grant has enabled a range of projects, including the digitalisation of back issues of the Radio Times and the creation of a website which presents a collection of historical consumer electronics images.

RTS celebrates 90th anniversary in Yorkshire

Melvyn Bragg touring the ITV Archives with RTS Yorkshire (Credit: RTS / Paul Harness)
The RTS was founded in September 1927, following a lecture at Leeds University from one of the future inventors of television, John Logie Baird.
 
“Invented before TV – the RTS was always ahead of its time,” said RTS Yorkshire Chair Fiona Thompson, while introducing Bragg to a sell-out crowd at ITV’s Leeds Television Centre in late-November.
 
During a wide-ranging address, the veteran arts broadcaster argued: “All new inventions provoke wonder and horror; hope and fear.” Television, too, has “a dark side”.