writing

Is this The End of the F***ing World?

“I think everyone can relate to that [feeling]” comments the 34-year-old. “When you’re 16 and you think everything’s conspiring against you.”

The award-winning drama garnered a cult following almost overnight earlier this year when it debuted on Channel 4 and shortly followed globally on Netflix.

Jed Mercurio's advice for screenwriters

Line of Duty (Credit: BBC)

Now's a great time to get into writing for TV. There have never been more opportunities for scripted programming. To stand out from the crowd, an idea should seem original and distinctive.

While the breadth of programming has increased, the traditional formats have remained dominant. Your writing should fit the standard models for a mini-series, a serial or an episodic series; 30 minutes for comedy, 60 minutes for drama.

Red Planet Pictures announces Writer's Room programme

Red Planet has invited four rising screenwriters to join the programme, where they will be paired with an established showrunner to develop an original idea from the its inception to production.

The first stage of the scheme will see the writers develop a contemporary crime thriller. The eight-part series, set in London, will be developed from start to finish by the Writers’ Room and be led by Red Planet CEO Tony Jordan.

Watch industry experts discuss their craft at the RTS Student Masterclasses

Morgan Matthews, Minnow Films, television, documentary, drama, student, masterclass, RTS, Paddington Green, Fourteen Days in May,

Students were given the opportunity to listen industry experts about their craft.

From cameraman Steve Robinson describing how to portray personal moments on camera to editor of BBC One's The Missing explaining how a show comes together in the cutting room, the two-day masterclasses provided advice and insight into the television industry. 

RTS Student Masterclass: Writing for drama

ITV, BBC Two, television, drama, RTS, student, masterclass, writing, research,

You could be forgiven for thinking that the award- winning screenwriter and producer, Jeff Pope, approaches his work by trying to find the most gruesome story possible.

This is the man who has made TV dramas based on the dark deeds of serial killer, Fred West, Moors murderers Ian Brady and Myra Hindley, and Britain’s most prolific hangman, Albert Pierrepoint.

What I'm watching with...Jeff Pope

At the RTS masterclasses November 2015, from left to right: Carolyn Reynolds, Jeff Pope and Jon Mountague

From writing hit show Philomena to co-writing and executive producing Cilla and Mrs Biggs, Jeff Pope has had a successful career in the media.

He started out in television by working as a researcher at ITV's London Weekend Television in 1983. Years later he became Head of Factual Drama at ITV Studios. 

In 2007 he won a BAFTA in screenplay for See No Evil: The Moors Murders. 

At this week's RTS Student Masterclasses he told eager television students that dramas tend to be re-written about fifteen times.