YouTube

Social Media Muscles in on TV

The way we access content is fundamentally changing.  Shorter-form content continues to grow apace and, at the same time, viewing is fragmenting across myriad devices and screens.  Helping drive this change has been the emergence of a new generation of distribution platforms that blend professional video, user generated content and social media.

Digital gurus hail 'most exciting time' for online video

YouTube and Facebook, which between them boast 19 billion daily views worldwide, offer huge online platforms to video content producers but television is also entering the market.

Sky’s new TV service Sky Q includes an online video section, bringing together content from many digital creators, including Barcroft Media, Red Bull Media House and GoPro. And youth brand Vice recently announced that its first European linear TV channel, Viceland, would launch in September.

Beyond YouTube: What are the new online channels?

MCNs are big business, with the leaders among them like Vice, Maker Studios, Red Bull and Fullscreen proving adept at reaching young people, often reaching hundreds of millions of viewers globally.

Having traditionally built their audiences for online stars like PewDiePie and Zoella principally through YouTube, MCNs are increasingly branching out to find new audience on other platforms, including Facebook, as well as more traditional outlets like theatrical-release films and TV channels.

BT to broadcast first episode of The Terror on YouTube

(Credit: AMC)

The show, originally aired on AMC in America and is, in part, based on the true story of two ships, HMS Terror and HMS Erebus, which became trapped in the icy Northwest passage whilst mapping the Arctic coastline in the 19th Century. The series also draws inspiration from Dan Simmons' 2007 best-selling novel of the same name. It combines the real-life drama of being stuck in treacherous conditions with a sinister supernatural element.

Google boss defends Fake News record

“Don’t take this as me being rude, but as a Brit who’s proud of and grown up with our amazing content,” he urged broadcasters to experiment “with different platforms and technologies – I really believe there’s an enormous opportunity for original British content.

“We need some positive opportunities for export right now and the [online] audience is there, it’s growing and it’s going to double in the next five years.”

YouTube Red commissions first UK drama from The Crown creators

YouTube Red has commissioned its debut drama, which will be a sci-fi series from Left Bank Pictures who produced The Crown for Netflix.

They have agreed a deal for Origin, a 10 part sci-fi thriller, created and written by Mika Watkins who has previously written for Sky 1's Stan Lee’s Lucky Man.

At a recent RTS Futures event, the topic of what YouTube meant for the future of television was discussed.

Does YouTube need TV?

“YouTube is an amazing platform – you can build an audience and you know that they’re there to see you,” said football freestyler Daniel Cutting. “I don’t think my audience – kids between 8 and 13 or 14 – watch TV.”
He has more than 250,000 YouTube subscribers and more than half a million Instagram followers watching his football tricks. “On TV you don’t get to know the person; they’re kind of distant. [Online, viewers] can engage, comment and like, and potentially get a response from someone. YouTubers are becoming the new celebrities,” he said.

BT announces live UEFA Champions League coverage in virtual reality

BT has revealed plans to broadcast the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Europa League finals for free on YouTube, the BT website, BT Sport channels and the BT app for 2017.

The UEFA Champions League final will be broadcast for the first time in 4K UHD with Dolby Atmos on BT Sport and 4K UHD on YouTube, with multiple 360 degree streams on Youtube and the new BT Sport VR App, which allows viewers to choose their own camera viewpoint as well as commentary and graphics.